Throughout the world, solutions to some of the greatest challenges of the day are either nascent or fully thriving. Organized people's movements - sometimes with help from supportive government - are changing the structures which cause violence, poverty, inequality, and environmental destruction. At the same time, they are creating better quality of life in their communities.  In other instances, people are preserving ancient cultures where individuals live in relative equity and harmony with other life and their communities, and without expectation of profit. 

Join us to learn more and become a part of this inspiring movement:
  • We are thrilled to announce our latest book, Fault Lines: Views Across Haiti's Divide by Beverly Bell, published by Cornell University Press. You can find out more about the book, read an excerpt, and order it online by visiting the book's website.

  • We continue to support indigenous peoples in Honduras who are defending their lands and rivers, and to challenge US-supported attacks on them by the Honduran government. Honduran movement leaders from the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) have been specifically targeted by the government and international dam companies.

  • Check out Other Worlds' book & educational tool, Harvesting Justice: Transforming Food, Land, and Agriculture in the Americas, which explores the growing movement to reclaim the food system from multinational agribusiness and put it back into the hands of people. Accompanying the book is a popular education curriculum called Sowing Seeds, and a weekly blog series! And, find more resources and action steps on the Harvesting Justice website.

  • Four and a half years after the devastating 2010 earthquake, read about how Haitian grassroots movements are continuing the struggle for a just reconstruction on our Another Haiti is Possible blog.
     
  • Visit our blog, below, of articles by and about our allies building grassroots alternatives around the world (click here for full blog history).

Alternatives Blog

The Ancestral Values We Inherited: Protecting Indigenous Water, Land, and Culture in Mexico

August 31, 2013

By Tory Field and Beverly Bell

An interview with Saúl Atanasio Roque Morales.


Saúl Atanasio Roque Morales, second from the left, in Mexico. Photo: Fernanda Robinson.

The following is from an interview with Saúl Atanasio Roque Morales, a Xoxocotla indigenous man from the state of Morelos, Mexico. He is a member of the Council of Peoples and the Xoxocotla Drinking Water Association.

Within our indigenous community of Xoxocotla, we continue to hold the ancestral values we inherited. It never crosses our mind to leave them behind. Because in daily life we are always in contact with nature, with our lands, with our water, with our air. We live in harmony with nature because we don’t like the way that modernity is advancing, destroying our territory and our environment. We believe technological modernity is better named a death threat.

DECLARATION-- FIRST REGIONAL FORUM REGARDING THE MINING INDUSTRY AND ITS IMPACT ON INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES. MAGDALENA TEITIPAC AUGUST 17TH 2013

August 29, 2013

Important declaration created following the Regional Forum on Mining and Indigenous Communities:

Inline image 1

The peoples, communities, and organizations that have gathered in the community of Magdalena Teitipac to analyze the impact of the mining industry on the region of the Tlacolula valley in Oaxaca; as well as to share the experiences of resistance of other affected communities and towns by mining projects both in their territory as well as in social issues.

“THEY FEAR US BECAUSE WE’RE FEARLESS”: RECLAIMING INDIGENOUS LANDS AND STRENGTH IN HONDURAS

August 27, 2013

By Beverly Bell and Tory Field


COPINH members on a piece of their ancestral land to which they had just won title. Photo: Oscar Andrade.

“Honduras has been known for two things only: being a military base for the [contra] attacks on the Nicaraguan revolution, and Hurricane Mitch.” So said Berta Caceres, co-founder and general coordinator of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH by its Spanish acronym). COPINH is an organization of hundreds of communities of Lenca indigenous peoples and small farmers.

“Now They’re All Dead": Threats of Assassination to Human Rights Advocates in Haiti

August 21, 2013

Attorney Patrice Florvilus speaks at a press conference denouncing threats made against him and other Haitian human rights defenders.

 

By Mark Snyder and Other Worlds

August 21, 2013

 

"Those before you were strong. Now they’re all dead. Stop what you are doing, or the same will happen to you."

Join Delegation to Mexico: Learn from indigenous communities defending their land against mega-development projects

August 15, 2013

SURCO A.C., Oaxaca, México invites you to join an:

EDUCATIONAL / SOLIDARITY DELEGATION TO OAXACA, MÉXICO

“DEFENSE OF INDIGENOUS TERRITORIES: COMMUNITY WELL-BEING, HUMAN RIGHTS & THE ENVIRONMENT Versus INTERNATIONAL MINING COMPANIES IN OAXACA”

Currently available 2013 delegation dates:

October 5-13, Nov. 23-Dec. 1

CONTEXT:

URGENT ACTION required to protect movement leaders in Honduras

August 14, 2013

 

Please respond to this urgent demand, circulated by our friends at Agricultural Missions, Inc.

Brief:  COPINH (Honduras) leaders face trumped up charges to break the back of 140+ day road occupation which has effectively stopped the installation of a hydro electric dam project on the Sacred Gualcarque River in Lenca Territory in Rio Blanco, HondurasLenca People:  No means No!*  (*Indigenous peoples have an internationally recognized right to collectively be consulted and approve or deny proposals for use of their lands, under ILO Convention 169)

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