Displaced Peoples' Camps & the Urgency of Housing

URGENT ACTION: MASS DEPRIVATION OF NATIONALITY UNDERWAY IN DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

November 15, 2013

Cross-posted from Amnesty International

The Constitutional Court ruling which deprives thousands of individuals of foreign descent of their Dominican nationality is being implemented. This has created an increasing nationalist and hostile atmosphere where individuals of Haitian descent are particularly discriminated against and at risk of violence and further violations.

URGENT ACTION: Hundreds face violent forced eviction

October 22, 2013

Cross-posted from Amnesty International

Hundreds of people left homeless after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti are the victims of an ongoing violent campaign involving police officers to forcibly evict them from their makeshift shelters.

Residents of the Lanmè Frape area of Canaan, an informal settlement in the municipality of Cabaret, on the northern outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, have had their simple dwellings repeatedly destroyed by police officers accompanied by armed men. The residents told Amnesty International that they have been the victims of attacks on more than 10 occasions over the last 18 months and several of them have also been arrested on unfounded charges for periods of up to a month. Two hundred families  currently remain in the Lanmè Frape area, although as many as 600 lived there before the forced evictions began.

“Now They’re All Dead": Threats of Assassination to Human Rights Advocates in Haiti

August 21, 2013

Attorney Patrice Florvilus speaks at a press conference denouncing threats made against him and other Haitian human rights defenders.

 

By Mark Snyder and Other Worlds

August 21, 2013

 

"Those before you were strong. Now they’re all dead. Stop what you are doing, or the same will happen to you."

January 12, 2013: What are the Memories? Where are the Lessons?

January 11, 2013

Today, the Haitian Collective to Defend the Right to Housing commemorates the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Titanyen, the site of the earthquake’s mass graves.

January 11, 2013
Haitian Collective to Defend the Right to Housing

It has been three years since falling rubble, bits of concrete, iron bars, and collapsing walls killed countless courageous women and men while they were at work, at school, in their homes or on the streets. In less than one minute, we lost many beautiful people – people filled with love, whose hearts were filled with hope. We lost elders, children, youth, academics, professionals, factory workers, peasants, and vendors. They were lost. We lost them.

Today, we have come to Titanyen where so many of their bodies lay in mass graves, to ask ‘Where have they gone?’ What have we done with their memories, their stories, their suffering?

Over 50 Dead in Haiti from Hurricane; Nearly 400,000 in Tents — Why?

November 1, 2012

Cross-posted from the Institute for Public Accuracy

by Brian Concannon [email], via Nicole Phillips [email], and our own Alexis Erkert, [in Haiti] [email]

Our own Alexis Erkert gives a detalied response to the question: Over 50 Dead in Haiti from Hurricane; Nearly 400,000 in Tents — Why? 

What dreams are made of: Haiti Kanpé

October 3, 2012

Cross-posted from the Trinidad & Tobago Review Column, posted on Miriam Chancy's website.

Trinidad & Tobago Review Column, Sept. 2012

Prince Luc, artist, Director, FOSAJ, w/Papier Maché Carnival Puppets, Jacmel 2012©MJA Chancy

Who has never dreamed? Of a desired object, person, or state of being? Who has never dreamed? Who has never dared to dream?

A week ago today, I sat in Cyvadier, on the outskirts of Jacmel in southern Haiti, and listened to Guerda Constant tell me the story of her ad-hoc work with rural youth, work she does in addition to her full time occupation working with NGOs.  I listened to her telling me of how she speaks with young Haitians, especially in rural areas, hoping to raise in them an awareness of their own gifts, of the beauty of their country, despite all evidence to the contrary.  Guerda told me the story of one little girl gifted with a beautiful singing voice.  She asked the girl what was her dream and the girl responded that she had none.  Guerda pressed her, asking her what she thought of when she let loose with her friends, what she wondered about.  The girl responded that she did not wonder about anything.  And when you are alone? Guerda asked, what do you think about.  And the girl answered that she did not think about anything in particular but that, occasionally, when a day, or two had gone by and she had not eaten, she would make her way to the side of a river running close to her house, find a spot, and sing there, alone, until she felt better, until the pangs of hunger left her and the song lifted her beyond the pain and despair.  This gift, this song, Guerda asked, thinking of the long history of Haitian troubadours, don’t you dream of doing something with it, of singing for others?  No, the girl answered. Here, I can’t afford to dream.  Guerda is one of many Haitians working to restore the capacity to dream and to hope to the youth of Haiti.  But we may well wonder what it means when a generation of children cannot dare to dream, refuses to dream, because they have already seen too much, or too little, to warrant what must strike them as reckless optimism.

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