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Workers' Power

African Seed & Food Sovereignty

Other Worlds brings to you a 7-part article series on African food and seed sovereignty, which will feature interviews with grassroots leaders (mostly women) from Senegal, Mali, Kenya, Zimbabwe and South Africa. Each is working for seed sovereignty and the decolonization of Africa’s food system.

Agroecology: The Bold Future for Africa

It’s time for us to recognize that agroecology is the future of farming in Africa! Industrial agriculture is a dead end. It claims to have raised yields in places but it has done so at great cost, with extensive soil damage, huge biodiversity loss and negative impacts on nutrition, food sovereignty and natural resources.

The Black Co-Op Movement: The Silent Partner in Critical Moments of African-American History: An Interview with Jessica Gordon Nembhard

The Federation of Southern Cooperatives logo, courtesy of Jessica Gordon Nembhard.
The Federation of Southern Cooperatives logo, courtesy of Jessica Gordon Nembhard.

 

For National Co-op Month, we present a three-part series from an interview with Jessica Gordon Nembhard who is Professor of Community Justice & Social Economic Development at John Jay College, CUNY; and an Affiliate Scholar at the Centre for the Study of Co-operatives at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada. She serves on the following boards: Grassroots Economic Organizing, the Association of Cooperative Educators, and the US Solidarity Economy Network; and is a founding member of the Eastern Conference for Workplace Democracy, and the US Federation of Worker Cooperatives. Gordon Nembhard’s acclaimed new book is Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice. This is the first of a three-part interview to run during October, which is Co-op Month. See the first piece, Black Cooperative Economics During Enslavement, here.

The Black Co-Op Movement: The Silent Partner in Critical Moments of African-American History: An Interview with Jessica Gordon Nembhard

The Federation of Southern Cooperatives logo, courtesy of Jessica Gordon Nembhard.
The Federation of Southern Cooperatives logo, courtesy of Jessica Gordon Nembhard.

For National Co-op Month, we present a three-part series from an interview with Jessica Gordon Nembhard who is Professor of Community Justice & Social Economic Development at John Jay College, CUNY; and an Affiliate Scholar at the Centre for the Study of Co-operatives at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada. She serves on the following boards: Grassroots Economic Organizing, the Association of Cooperative Educators, and the US Solidarity Economy Network; and is a founding member of the Eastern Conference for Workplace Democracy, and the US Federation of Worker Cooperatives. Gordon Nembhard’s acclaimed new book is Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice. This is the first of a three-part interview to run during October, which is Co-op Month. See the first piece, Black Cooperative Economics During Enslavement, here.

Students Declare Support for the Landless Families Occupying Esalq Area

They denounce the idle land use, separation of small milk producers in the region and the influence of the former owners to acquire the area. Several students from the Levante Popular da Juventude [Popular Uprising of Youth], the National Biology Student Body (ENEBio) and academic centers of USP [University of São Paulo] publicly declared support for about 1,200 landless families occupying the Fazenda Figueira in Londrina (PR) on the last day August 17th.

For Immediate Release: Black and Afro-Indigenous Farmers Share 2015 Food Sovereignty Prize

Contact: Lisa Griffith, National Family Farm Coalition

US Food Sovereignty Alliance

(773)319-5838, lisa@nffc.net

In this moment when it is vital to assert that Black lives matter, the U.S. Food Sovereignty Alliance honors Black and Afro-Indigenous farmers, fishermen, and stewards of ancestral lands and water. We especially honor them as a vital part of food chain workers, who together are creating food sovereignty, meaning a world with healthy, ecologically produced food, and democratic control over food systems.

In 2015, the U.S. Food Sovereignty Alliance’s two prize winners are the Federation of Southern Cooperatives in the U.S., and the Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras. The prizes will be presented in Des Moines on October 14, 2015.

Rojava – the formation of an economic alternative: Private property in the service of all

By: Michael Knapp, Historian; Translated from German original by Richard Braude

Cross-posted from: Peace in Kurdistan Campaign

Originally released on: 6 February, 2015

 

 

The revolution in Rojava (West Kurdistan/ North Syria), which started in Kobanî (Ain al-Arab) and spread like wildfire through Afrîn, Dêrik (Al-Malikiya), Qamişlo (Al-Qamishli), Amûdê and Serê Kaniyê (Ras al-Ayn) – the regions lying on the Turkish-Syrian border – has launched an alternative development in all aspects of society.

Inspired by the model of democratic confederalism and democratic autonomy, democratic assemblies, women’s council and other democratic organisations have been established. Every ethnic and religious group must be represented in these councils, and the leadership of each evenly divided between the sexes. This is not a project striving towards a nation state, but for democratic autonomy in the region and a democratic Syria.

Gratiferias: The Market Where Everything is Free

By: Julie Liardet

Cross-posted from WorldCrunch

Originally released on September 09, 2012

 

GENEVA - People strolling, music, smiles, bursts of laughter. Customers walk between clothes and trinkets, homegrown zucchini and children's games, spread on tables or on the ground. A neighbor has brought his electric razor; another has just found a book by French sociologist Marcel Mauss

 

The First Global Festival for Anti-Capitalist Resistance and Rebellion

The First Global Festival for Anti-Capitalist Resistance and Rebellion

by JAVIER SETHNESS CASTRO

reposted from Counterpunch, January 26, 2015

Organized by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) and the National Indigenous Congress (CNI), the first annual Festival Mundial de las Resistencias y Rebeldías contra el Capitalismo, or the Global Festival for Anti-Capitalist Resistance and Rebellion, was held in central and southern Mexico over a two-week period at the end of 2014 and beginning of 2015. The event’s subtitle sums up its purpose well: “While those from above destroy, those from below rebuild.”

The New Disruption: Only rank-and-file workers can build a better labor movement.

By Chris Maisano

Cross-posted from Jacobin

Originally posted on January 19, 2015

Michigan timber workers reading the bulletin board at strike headquarters in 1937.

Ted Fertik is terrified by the possibility that US unions may soon lose the agency shop. I don’t blame him — it’s a pretty scary prospect. Most unions today are not well positioned to mitigate the potential impact on their organizational and financial wherewithal.

If the recent experience of AFSCME in Wisconsin is any guide, they should expect to see a substantial portion of their membership base evaporate more or less overnight. Income from dues and fees would be drastically reduced, and unions would struggle to fund many of their current day-to-day activities. I certainly don’t relish the thought that this could happen sometime in the very near future.

Despite these completely valid fears, one should not make the claim, as Fertik does, that “the possibility of the demise of the Wagner Act might mean the demise of worker organization tout court.” To begin with, the end of agency shop would not spell the death of the Wagner Act, which would still allow workers (union and non-union alike) to engage in protected concerted activity, as well as the recognition of members-only unions.